Autore Topic: La lancia numero 6 della Turbo Nave "Rex"  (Letto 5770 volte)

0 Utenti e 1 Visitatore stanno visualizzando questo topic.

micky.38

  • Visitatore
Re:La lancia numero 6 della Turbo Nave "Rex"
« Risposta #15 il: 07 Giu 2013, 10:47:03 »
Devo avere da qualche parte il resoconto completo della missione... appena lo ritrovo lo posto (sono un casinaro...) Il mio "che c'azzecca" si riferiva proprio all'Hampden!!! MAI fidarsi delle didascalie..... :friends:

Offline Al

  • Post: 419
  • Cp. Genio Pionieri Aquileia
Re:La lancia numero 6 della Turbo Nave "Rex"
« Risposta #16 il: 07 Giu 2013, 14:23:26 »
Grazie Micky, resto in attesa....
Cp. Genio Pionieri Aquileia "Tenace, infaticabile, modesta"

micky.38

  • Visitatore
Re:La lancia numero 6 della Turbo Nave "Rex"
« Risposta #17 il: 07 Giu 2013, 16:53:12 »
intanto questa...

Oblique aerial photograph taken from the first of twelve Bristol Beaufighters of No. 272 Squadron RAF that made a low-level attack on the Italian liner REX in Capodistria Bay south of Trieste, September 8, 1944 (see caption of other photo on same subject). Although the rocket projectiles fired by this aircraft can be seen to have missed the vessel, she was subsequently hit by 59 RPs and numerous cannon rounds fired by the other Beaufighters, which left her on fire and badly listing. The REX was finished off later that day by twelve more Beaufighters from No. 39 Squadron RAF and No. 16 Squadron SAAF when, following another attack with RP and cannon, she rolled over and sank in the shallow water.


micky.38

  • Visitatore
Re:La lancia numero 6 della Turbo Nave "Rex"
« Risposta #18 il: 07 Giu 2013, 16:59:40 »
e questa...


"... On the 7th September while we were at Borgo, we got orders to fly all serviceable aircraft and their crews to Falconara in Italy for a special top secret operation. At that time we only had eight aircraft and crews left after a lot of losses. We flew with one ground crew airman in each aircraft in addition, of course, to our navigators.
When we arrived at Falconara, having no idea what was 'in the wind' we were summoned for briefing by the Group Captain, who informed us that we were going to attack and attempt to sink the Italian Liner 'Rex', 51,000 tons displacement, the pride of Mussolini and the Italian nation, which had a few years before held the Blue Ribband for the fastest crossing of the Atlantic. The 'Rex' had been berthed at Pola (now known as Pula) in Istria, which until after the War was part of Italy, in order, presumably, to keep it safe from hostilities. Allied reconnaissance aircraft had spotted that smoke was coming from the ship's funnels indicating that it was being prepared to set sail. A watch was being kept on it, and that day (7th September) it was seen sailing on its way northwards in the Adriatic, escorted by a Destroyer and two F Boats, presumably making for Trieste. Intelligence sources indicated that it was to be sunk by the Germans in the harbour entrance to act as a 'block ship' to help protect Trieste from Allied naval and invasion vessels entering the harbour and landing troops and equipment in Trieste, strengthening the southern front into Germany. However, whatever the strategic implications, it was considered important that the 'Rex' should be attacked and sunk, and as there were no warships near enough to do the job, it was up to the RAF to do it. So we were briefed to attack the 'Rex' with our eight Beaufighters using Rocket Projectiles. We had never tackled anything anywhere near the size of the 'Rex' and we wondered whether our 25 lb semi-armour-piercing rockets would do the trick. At the briefing we were told to attack during the morning, and 252 Squadron, also flying Beaus would carry out a further attack in the afternoon. With the anti-aircraft fire power from the destroyer and two F boats we anticipated heavy losses, and with the possibility of guns having been fitted to the 'Rex' and the probability of German fighter aircraft escort, we wondered if any of our Beaus would return to base.
For the first and only time we were given fighter cover. There were no long range fighters available (only Beaufighters and they were being used in their shipping strike role) so a Squadron of US Mustangs was detailed as fighter cover. They were fitted with external long range fuel tanks, but even so, flying low, which for their aircraft was the most uneconomical height, they said they would only be able to provide cover as far as the target, then return to their base at their normal operational height. However, this was better than nothing, except that their idea of low flying wasn't ours, and we were conscious that they may be picked up by enemy radar before we could get in and attack. (We also heard from them afterwards that they thought we were mad flying as low as we did over the sea!)
So at 10.25 hrs. the eight remaining Beaus of 272 Squadron set course for the bay of Trieste, led by Squadron Leader Roderick Rose, who had been given the ship's latest position by a reconnaissance aircraft. We were armed with our usual eight RPs fitted with 25 lb SAP heads and fully loaded cannons. I was flying No. 2 to Sqd Ldr Rose, which meant that we would be the second aircraft to attack. Nebbie Rose's navigator, Warrant Officer L. Shaw, did his job perfectly, and led us right to the target. We were at zero feet as usual, the weather was good but rather misty. I could just see the cliffs ahead when the Sqd Ldr broke RT silence and called "Target ahead! Attack!" He pulled up to 1,200 ft and I followed, and I remember shouting to Tom over the intercom "What a bloody big ship"! And she was, all 51,000 tons of her. I had already selected 'Salvo' on the rocket switch, which meant that all eight rockets would fire at the same time. I dived, aiming for the water line, fired my canons to put off any gunners who might be on the ship, then fired my rockets. I had to pull up really hard to avoid hitting the ship's super-structure.
There was heavy AA from Trieste, but none of it came too near us. The only other flak came from one of the F boats, which was strafed by one of the Mustangs. The Mustangs also dropped their external fuel tanks to cause some diversion as they hit the water. There was no firing from the other F boat or the destroyer.
As we left the area we more or less regrouped, and when Tom and I counted we could only see  six other Beaus - however the missing one turned out to be the Sqd Ldr who had stayed in the area after the attack to make sure all our aircraft were safe, and he soon joined us to lead all eight Beaus back safely to Falconara, landing at 12.20 hours. At the debriefing we learnt that 59 rockets were fired and hit the target. Between us we also fired 4,000 rounds of 20 mm. canon fire. We were obviously thrilled to bits over the success of the strike, and particularly thankful that all our aircraft returned safely, as did the Mustang crews.
It wasn't until the following day that we learnt that when 252 Squadron went to carry out their  attack late in the afternoon, the 'Rex' was already on her side, sinking and burning fiercely. In my log book there is a slip which reads:
"CONGRATULATORY MESSAGE. The following signal has been received from the Air Officer Commanding MACAF. 'We now know that entire credit for destruction of Liner Rex rests with your Squadron and is shared with no other squadron. Your crews certainly made a good job of it. A very enviable feather in your cap, Well done, 272 Squadron'."



frogvenice

  • Visitatore
Re:La lancia numero 6 della Turbo Nave "Rex"
« Risposta #19 il: 07 Giu 2013, 17:59:32 »
Bello l'articolo ed interessante il messaggio di congratulazioni . Giudicandolo con il senno di poi , a settant'anni di distanza,
erano proprio dei gran tiratori , hanno centrato con i razzi una nave lunga 200 metri. Anche uno cieco come una talpa ci sarebbe
riuscito..... ma tant'è, ....c'est la guerre.

Offline Al

  • Post: 419
  • Cp. Genio Pionieri Aquileia
Re:La lancia numero 6 della Turbo Nave "Rex"
« Risposta #20 il: 08 Giu 2013, 22:00:02 »
Grazie Micky...
Da questa relazione e soprattutto dalla frase "l'orgoglio di Mussolini e degli italiani" si capisce perché hanno dovuto affondarcela a tutti i costi!!!
Ma come dice Frog, la guerra e' guerra.....

A Genova fino a settembre c'è una mostra dedicata alla nave.

Grazie ancora & ciao
Cp. Genio Pionieri Aquileia "Tenace, infaticabile, modesta"

Offline francesco

  • Post: 313
Re:La lancia numero 6 della Turbo Nave "Rex"
« Risposta #21 il: 23 Giu 2013, 21:01:48 »
Ed informare il Comune, la Provincia e la Regione?
Ed informare Il Ministero della Difesa?
Ed informare il Ministero dei Beni culturali?
Ed informare "Striscialanotizia"?

Ad estremi mali, estremi rimedi...

Offline francesco

  • Post: 313
Re:La lancia numero 6 della Turbo Nave "Rex"
« Risposta #22 il: 23 Giu 2013, 21:11:24 »
Humm! bellissime foto.
Non c'è che dire, sicuramente una delle migliori azioni antinave messe a segno dalla Raf.

Tra parentesi, prima della guerra, ogni volta che il Rex attraversava lo stetto di Gibilterra per andare in Atlantico, essa veniva fermata dal blocco navale britannico.
Controllati i passeggeri e depredato (pardon) requisito il carico ritenuto proibito, la nave poteva riprendere la sua navigazione.

Offline Al

  • Post: 419
  • Cp. Genio Pionieri Aquileia
Re:La lancia numero 6 della Turbo Nave "Rex"
« Risposta #23 il: 24 Giu 2013, 09:28:16 »
Grazie Francesco, al momento mi sto occupando del vincolo per evitare la demolizione....
Cp. Genio Pionieri Aquileia "Tenace, infaticabile, modesta"